Booty Call

on February 28, 1997 by Dwayne E. Leslie
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Audiences expecting to see a movie about multiple "booty calls" (post-2 a.m. phone conversations that result in no-questions-asked sex sessions) will be surprised by "Booty Call," which makes only oral references to that activity. In this streetwise comedy with an urban flair, the importance of safe sex is taken to another level. Compared to what Rushon ("Woo's" Tommy Davidson) and Bunz (Jamie Foxx, of WB Network's "The Jaime Foxx Show") have to go through, real-life no-glove/no-love scenarios are a piece of cake.
Nikki ("How to Make an American Quilt's" Tamala Jones) sets up a double date after a seven-week courtship with her beau, Rushon. She knows his hormones are raging, but she wants to make sure he doesn't want her just for sex. Nikki invites her arbitrageur friend Lysterine ("Set It Off's" Vivica A. Fox), and Rushon invites his womanizing friend Bunz. Bunz and Lysterine are enemies at first sight, their weaponry of choice being rapid-fire insults sure to induce laughter. When the smoke clears, aggressive lust erupts within them. Things are going great for both gents until they find themselves spending most of the night on the search for latex condoms--and clingwrap.
"Booty Call" marks the first re-teaming of Davidson and Foxx since their days together on Fox TV's "In Living Color." Davidson, a funny comedian, is oddly cast as a straight man; on the other hand, Foxx's Bunz has wit streaming from his pores. But both actors profit from being given the freedom to improvise. The film crosses color lines and makes fun of every race; a highlight is a conversation spoken in Cantonese by Foxx and Fox, leaving the Asian extras in even more shock than audiences will be. "Booty Call" is funny throughout (not wanting to miss a trick, the filmmakers even give a dog subtitles for his barking), although the majority of laughs come in the first half. Starring Jamie Foxx, Tommy Davidson, Vivica A. Fox and Tamala Jones. Directed by Jeff Pollack. Written by Takashi Burrord and Bootsie. Produced by John Morrissey. A Columbia release. Comedy. Rated R for nonstop sexuality including sex-related dialogue and humor, and for strong language. Running time: 80 min.
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