Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

on July 31, 1953 by BOXOFFICE Staff
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  One of the most famous gold-diggers of all time, the diamond-loving Lorelei Lee, is portrayed by the boxoffice bombshell, Marilyn Monroe, in a lavish, colorful and hilarious Technicolor musical. With Jane Russell, singing, delivering comedy lines and exuding sex as her more level-headed showgirl friend while Marilyn acts the dim-witted blonde to perfection -- in a manner to make the male patrons drool -- this will be a tremendous grosser. In addition to Monroe and Russell, the fame of the Anita Loos novel, which later became a play and then a smash musical, and the several hit songs, which are again being heard on jukeboxes everywhere are strong exploitation angles. A New York preview audience howled and applauded the big production numbers and the spicy dialogue, some of it not for the kiddies. The Jack Cole dances are show-stoppers. Directed by Howard Hawks. Produced by Sol C. Siegel.

THE STORY:
Lorelei Lee (Marilyn Monroe) and her girl-friend Jane Russell, sing in a nightclub where Marilyn sets her cap for wealthy Tommy Noonan. When the latter's father forestalls the marriage, Marilyn gets Tommy to send her and Jane to Europe, all expenses paid. On the ship, Elliot Reid has been hired to spy on Marilyn, but he spends most of his time courting Jane. However, he does get Marilyn in a compromising situation with Charles Coburn, who later steals his wife's tiara for her. In Paris, the girls find the police waiting for them and they hear that Noonan has canceled their credit. They get jobs in a French club, where the police mistakenly arrest Jane, decked out in a blonde wig. Reid helps the girls get back the tiara and Noonan's father becomes reconciled to Marilyn for a double-wedding finale.

CATCHLINES:
Diamonds are a girl's best friend -- and Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe are the nation's favorite glamour girls... Wait till you see Jane and Marilyn sing, dance and swing their hips across the Atlantic to Paris. 20th-Fox 91 min.

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