The Doom Generation

on October 25, 1995 by " Michael Haile
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   Billed as "the alienated teen pic to end all alienated teen pics," independent "queer new wave" director Gregg Araki's first foray into the world of 35mm film-making plays like a mordant, darkly comic, underground version of "Natural Born Killers." Like "NBK," "The Doom Generation" is a film many will talk about but few enjoy. Araki's twisted "heterosexual movie" chronicles the adventures of two lovers, the foul-mouthed speed freak Amy Blue (Rose McGowan) and her sweetly dopey boyfriend Jordan White (James Duval) after they pick up a sexy, dangerous drifter named Xavier Red (Johnathon Schaech). The three embark on a hellish road trip after Xavier murders a convenience store clerk.
   Propelled by an MTV alternative soundtrack and punctuated by some of the most graphic language, sex and violence you're likely to encounter this side of X (including one of the most brutal and disturbing scenes of rape and castration ever put on the big screen), the film is a disjointed attempt at pop culture satire disguised as teen angst manifesto. Like its disaffected characters, Araki's film is offbeat, daring and outrageous, but empty at the core.
   Cameo appearances by the likes of "Hollywood Madam" Heidi Fleiss, Christopher Knight (Peter from TV's "The Brady Bunch"), Lauren Tewes ("The Love Boat"), Amanda Bearse ("Married With Children"), actress Parker Posey, comedienne Margaret Cho and rocker Perry Farrell (Jane's Addiction) do little to enliven this mess. Unlike his dramas "Totally F-ed Up" and "The Living End," which brought a subversive intelligence to bear on teen nihilism, "The Doom Generation" is a senseless comic exercise in pushing the limits of decency for that sake alone and one that will leave audiences in agreement with the film's characters, who feel that "there's no place for us in this world.    Starring James Duval, Rose McGowan and Johnathon Schaech. Directed and written by Gregg Araki. Produced by Andrea Sperling and Gregg Araki. A Goldwyn release. Satire. Unrated. Running time: 85 min.
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