Kristin Lavransdatter

on August 01, 2008 by Shlomo Schwartzberg
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   Set in 14th-century Norway, director/scripter Liv Ullmann's second film is an epic account of a young woman (Elisabeth Matheson) whose determination to marry her true love (Bjorn Skagestad) pits her against her family and her society, which expects her to marry another.
   Sigrid Undset, who wrote the 1928 novel on which this film is based, received the Nobel prize for literature, but "Kristin Lavransdatter" won't garner any equivalent cinematic awards for Ullmann. Her style is best described as stodgy, and she fails utterly to bring her medieval settings to atmospheric life, although legendary cinematographer Sven Nykvist ensures that the movie at least looks great. Ullmann paces the story with such deliberation and so little of real consequence occurs that the three-hour running time sorely tries audience patience. It might have helped if the leads displayed some depth and fire, but they too fail to register emotionally.    Starring Elisabeth Matheson and Bjorn Skagestad. Directed and written by Liv Ullmann. Produced by Goran Lindstron and Ebsen Hoilund Carl-sen. No distributor set. Drama. Norwegian-language; subtitled. Not yet rated. Running time: 180 min.
Tags: Elisabeth Matheson and Bjorn Skagestad. Directed and written by Liv Ullmann. Produced by Goran Lindstron and Ebsen Hoilund Carl-sen, drama, marriage, Norway
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