Ten Minutes Older: The Trumpet

on August 01, 2008 by Chris Wiegand
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A variable beast by nature, the omnibus film is a precarious proposition. Popular amid European arthouses in the 1960s, these portmanteau portraits are traditionally set in a particular city, such as New Wave collection "Paris Vu Par...," focus on a particular source, like Edgar Allen Poe tribute "Spirits Of The Dead," or treat a particularly potent theme, a fine recent example being the self-explanatory "11'09"01."

As its title suggests, "Ten Minutes Older: The Trumpet" deals with time, opening with Marcus Aurelius's "Time is a river" reflection. Precisely where the trumpet fits in may become clear with the release of a forthcoming companion set, "Ten Minutes Older: The Cello," which features contributions from Jean-Luc Godard and Mike Figgis.

This considerable first collection features a stellar line-up of international directors yet offers little star appeal. The most enticing instalment boasts both. "Int. Trailer. Night" presents the inspired pairing of indie hipster Jim Jarmusch and arthouse 'it' girl Chloë Sevigny. Shot in black and white, it unfolds in real time, with Sevigny playing a glamorous actress taking time out in her trailer.

Jarmusch's one-time collaborator Aki Kaurismäki packs slightly more action into the excellent "Dogs Have No Hell," which sees a crumpled hero strive to set up a shotgun wedding before his train departs for Siberia. Similarly, Wim Wenders uses time as a dramatic force in "Twelve Miles To Trona," an atmospheric endeavour in which a driver who's consumed some lethal hallucinogens heads for hospital to get his stomach pumped. In this compelling contribution, Wenders marries trippy visuals with some rocking numbers from Eels.

The other shorts tend towards the meditative. Victor Erice's is a sombre historical allegory which is well shot by Angel Luis Fernandez, Chen Kaige's explores madness and memory, while Werner Herzog's presents a rainforest tribe for whom time is running out.

The pick of the litter is Spike Lee's dynamic mini-documentary "We Wuz Robbed," which uses fierce editing, head-on interviews and distinctive stills to re-examine the confusion surrounding the 2000 Presidential election. Starring Markku Peltola, Kati Outinen, Marko Haavisto, Ja Poutahaukat, Ana Sofia Liano, Pelayo Suarez, Celia Poo, Jose Antonio Amieva, Fernando Garcia Toriello, Chloë Sevigny, Charles Esten, Amber Tamblyn, Feng Yuanzheng, Gen Le, Li Qiang and Zhang Jin. Directed by Victor Erice, Werner Herzog, Jim Jarmusch, Chen Kaige, Aki Kaurismäki, Spike Lee and Wim Wenders. Written by Victor Erice, Werner Herzog, Jim Jarmusch, Tan Zhang, Aki Kaurismäki and Wim Wenders. Produced by Nicolas McClintock, Nigel Thomas, Ulrich Felsberg, Aki Kaurismäki, Lucki Stipetic, Cecilia Kate Roque and Spike Lee. No distributor set. Drama/Comedy/Documentary. English-, Spanish-, Finnish-, Mandarin- and German-language; subtitled. Not yet rated. Running time: 92 min.

Tags: Starring Markku Peltola, Kati Outinen, Marko Haavisto, Ja Poutahaukat, Ana Sofia Liano, Pelayo Suarez, Celia Poo, Jose Antonio Amieva, Fernando Garcia Toriello, Chlo Sevigny, Charles Esten, Amber Tamblyn, Feng Yuanzheng, Gen Le, Li Qiang and Zhang Jin. Directed by Victor Erice, Werner Herzog, Jim Jarmusch, Chen Kaige, Aki Kaurismki, Spike Lee and Wim Wenders. Written by Victor Erice, Tan Zhang, Aki Kaurismki and Wim Wenders. Produced by Nicolas McClintock, Nigel Thomas, Ulrich Felsberg, Lucki Stipetic, Cecilia Kate Roque, Spike Lee, Drama, Comedy, Documentary
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