Loverboy

Add Comment on April 28, 1989 by Tim Cogshell

Though it aspires to something a good deal more psychologically astute, "Loverboy," the feature directing debut of actor Kevin Bacon ("The Woodsman"), is really just a movie about a disturbed woman acting out badly. Emily (Kyra Sedgwick, Bacon's real-life wife and "Woodsman" co-star) is engaged in a bizarre reversal of the alienation she felt from her own parents through an inappropriate relationship with a very deliberately conceived son. Freud might have found something interesting here, but for most of us it's just a crazy mom movie, whatever contrivances the filmmakers use to make it all seem more profound.

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Oliver & Company

Add Comment on November 18, 1988 by Tom Matthews

When people complain about the atrocious state of most modern animation, they usually refer to the shabby technical quality that has reduced cartoons to being nothing but cheap, cynical vehicles for selling junk to children. But the thing that is even more missed--the thing that keeps the early Warner Bros. and Walt Disney shorts and features irresistible after all these years--is the heart and the humor that has been factored out by computers and shoddy overseas animation. Fortunately, Walt Disney Studios, God bless 'em, remains determined to honor its founder's memory by turning out terrific animated features, and with "Oliver & Company" they prove that, although economics have forced some corner-cutting, the soul lives on.

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The Big Blue

Add Comment on August 19, 1988 by BOXOFFICE Staff

   "The Big Blue" is an unusually strange and haunting romantic comedy from Luc Besson, the 29-year-old French writer/director who gave us the unusually strange and haunting romantic comedy "Subway" in 1986. It is also Besson's first film in English.    The good news here is that Besson's machete-like minimalist/new wave sense of humor has survived the translation completely intact, as have his penchant for unusual, incendiary, funny characters; his clean, swashbuckling camerawork; and his aptitude for fast, generous storytelling. The not-so-good news is that as leading cinematic visionaries go, Besson is still among the most peculiar. While this attribute will endear "Blue" to legions of Bessionites, it could spell big trouble for the film's American boxoffice.

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Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Add Comment on June 22, 1988 by BOXOFFICE Staff

   "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" is a wondrous, mind-boggling and impossibly clever movie that may, given a decade or two for hindsight, emerge as the most remarkable film of this high concept era.    The story is simple: A famous movie star in 1947 is finding his career threatened because his attention is being drawn toward his marital problems. His wife, a slinky lounge singer, has been playing "patty-cake" with an oily gag writer, and our hero is a mess about it.    In order to get his star to see what a tramp his wife is so that he'll dump her and get back to work, the star's boss hired a raggedy private eye named Eddie Valiant (Bob Hoskins) to get photographic evidence of the affair.

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Lady In White

Add Comment on April 22, 1988 by Tom Matthews

   "Lady in White" is an ambitious but muddled film that careens distractingly from genre to genre until the viewer is left exhausted and a little annoyed. It is being marketed as a ghost story, but (unfortunately) it is much, much more. br>   The story is set in a tiny American town called Willowpoint alls. The year is 1962, at a time when a boy named Frankie ("Witness'" Lukas Haas) is going through the usual joys and anxieties of being a kid. For an extended period of the time, the film is reminiscent of "A Christmas Story," complete with nostalgic humor and affectionate jabs at parents and teachers as seen through a child's eyes.

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Deadline

Add Comment on September 11, 1987 by Jon Alon Walz

Colin Nutley's bland “Deadline” is the stuff of prototypically average David E. Kelley/Steven Bochco American television, and just as out of date. An overworked, blonde and attractive up-and-coming newspaper journalist, Annika Bengton (Helena Bergstrom), works day and night to solve the mystery behind the bombing of Stockholm's under-construction Olympic Stadium, all the while trying to keep her own sanity as the internal newsroom politics threaten to pull her into the abyss. As the bombings continue, drawing Annika deeper and deeper in to the convoluted, not-ready-for-prime-time mystery, she is kidnapped by the bomber.

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Deadline

Add Comment on September 11, 1987 by Jordan Reed

Capital punishment is just one of the myriad hot-button issues in American political life. So when George Ryan, former Illinois governor and the hero of Katy Chevigny and Kirsten Johnson's unnerving doc "Deadline," decided to investigate flaws in the judicial system and grant clemency hearings for 167 death-row inmates in 2002, he took a big risk. (He was about to retire, but still.) Amazingly, his choice stemmed from the last-minute overturning of a conviction based on evidence found by journalism students at Northwestern University--proof that the state nearly executed an innocent man. ...

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