Seven Samurai

Add Comment on July 31, 1956 by BOXOFFICE Staff

Winner of the Lion of St. Mark award at the recent Venice Film Festival, this lengthy Japanese-language feature produced by Sojiro Motoki for Toho was seen by stage producer Joshua Logan, who brought it to Columbia's attention. As an action spectacle, it is a truly magnificent work with tremendous battle scenes filled with violence and cruelty, all splendidly directed by Akira Kurosawa of "Rashomon" fame. Although the black-and-white photography is striking, the beautiful color associated with recent Japanese films would have been an added asset. The picture is strong fare for the art houses but of little value generally.

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Earth Vs. The Flying Saucers (1956)

Add Comment on July 31, 1956 by BOXOFFICE Staff

With science-fiction vying with the time-honored western for a pat of the affection of action fans of all ages, this highly imaginative feature should encounter no difficulty in satisfying the patrons of most theatres and should prove potent in attracting many customers to the dual-program, subsequent situations. In concocting the offering, Charles H. Schneer and Sam Katzman, producer and executive producer respectively, availed themselves of many gimmicks utilized in preceding space operas and interpolated a few fantastic creations of their own. This lineup was embellished wit...

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The King And I

Add Comment on June 29, 1956 by Bridget Byrne

   This animated adaptation of the famous Rodgers and Hammerstein musical "The King and I" (an adaptation of "Anna and the King of Siam," itself a distortion of the real life experience of a Victorian governess hired to teach Western ways to an Eastern potentate's many children and, when he listens, which is not often, to the monarch himself) takes numerous liberties with the most loved aspects of the story. Unlike most cartoons aimed at children, the additions and alterations don't include animals which speak and sing; this is a pity because the black leopard, the irrepressible monkey and the mango-tossing elephants have much greater screen presence than any of the human characters.

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Diabolique

Add Comment on November 21, 1955 by Thomas Quinn

Without a lot of contrivances, and with fewer lapses of plausibility than usual for the genre, "Diabolique" works well as a crafty suspense drama. Designed as a smart noir thriller, it constantly undercuts our expectations and keeps us guessing from start to finish. It casts itself so self-consciously in the Hitchcockian tradition that the soundtrack even echoes the theme from "Vertigo" in a kind of homage to the legendary director. With several key exceptions, the film also closely parallels the original 1955 French "Diabolique," starring Simone Signoret. Sharon Stone is superb as Nicole H...

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The End of the Affair

Add Comment on May 03, 1955 by BOXOFFICE Staff

To transcribe to the screen one of Graham Greene's widely read novels of man's groping for spiritual faith and religious guidance requires skill and more than a normal amount of delicacy and tact. Those qualities are abundantly apparent in this British-made entry, which appears destined to enjoy a reasonably prosperous exhibition career in this country, particularly if merchandising attention is directed toward the two top cast names and the picture's literary derivation. The overall tone, however, is on the grim and heavy side, and it's possible that ticket buyers whose preference is for somewhat lighter celluloid entertainment may become restive, inasmuch as there are only a few scattered touches of comedy relief.

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Sabrina

Add Comment on August 07, 1954 by BOXOFFICE Staff

   It would be well-nigh impossible currently to recruit a trio of stars with more powerful combined marquee magnetism than the three topliners assembled by producer/director Billy Wilder for this screen version of the widely known stage success. That high-voltage thespian endowment and literary genesis certainly should attract capacity patronage to all initial bookings, most especially in urban and sophisticated communities. By the same token, they accord the heavy artillery for profitably promoting the photoplay. While most spectators will appreciate the impressive mountings, the qual...

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Robinson Crusoe

Add Comment on August 05, 1954 by BOXOFFICE Staff

   In 1659, a great storm blows a ship on the rocks near an island someplace in the New World. Robinson Crusoe is hurled on the beach of an island close by and spends the night in the jungle. The next morning, he makes his way to the wrecked ship, builds a raft and salvages supplies, finding no other survivors. Crusoe spends 18 years alone before he discovers cannibals are using the other end of his island for their "banquets" and he rescues a native who becomes his servant and is called Friday.    Defoe's classic is brought to the screen again with color and action by Tepeyac Productions in Mexico. It is well done in a pedestrian sort of way but lacks cast marquee appeal.

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