Russia

FORECAST: Russian Box Office Expected to Grow 9.6% in 2013 on March 05, 2013

Analyst group Movie Research announced this week that they project the Russian box office will grow 9.6% this year, a hike that will make the country from last year's $1.28 billion haul to $1.4 billion. A large chunk of that growth will come from increased ticket prices, but the analysts also expect to see movie admissions jump by 2.6%. Also on the clime is the proportion of the box office that belongs to local Russian productions. Last year, Russian films made up 15.1% of the total intake, but Movie Research predicts 2013 will see closer to 17.5% -- a positive, but small step in a country that's already discussing implementing strict limits on the number of foreign pictures it will allow in the future. Russia still has great room for growth. In a sprawling country of 142 million, less than a third of its citizens live near movie theaters, and only 10% of those consider themselves frequent filmgoers.

Russian Films Projected to Claim Top Three Spots on Box Office Charts on March 04, 2013

dyatlov.jpgOfficial numbers are still rolling in, but three Russian productions have staked out their claims at the top of the box office. In the #3 spot is last week's champion, the subway disaster thriller Metro. Just ahead of it should be the Renny Harlin snowbound mystery The Dyatlov Pass Incident, while the sex comedy What's Happening, Man should have capitalized on its early Thursday take to dominate the charts at #1. Not in the top three? Any of the weekend's U.S. releases, which included Judd Apatow's This is 40 and the animated cartoon Escape From Planet Earth. 

'Metro' Must Fend Off Two Challengers With Russian Ties on March 01, 2013

whats_happening.jpgLast weekend, the Russian disaster film Metro easily stole the top place on the charts and has sold well all week. But this weekend, it follows intense -- and very different -- competition from two flicks with connections to the country. The biggest rival is the sex comedy What's Happening Man, which tracks a seduction competition between four men who have five days to bed as many women as possible for a half-million dollar prize. The second is the Renny Harlin snow-bound thriller The Dyatlov Pass Incident, which recreates the mysterious deaths of nine hikers in the Russian mountains in 1959. The fatalities initially appeared to be an open-and-shut case of hypothermia, but unexplained injuries and odd circumstances have turned the tragedy into a legend -- and now, into a found footage horror film. Also in the mix this weekend is the Canadian cartoon Escape From Planet Earth, which features the voices of William Shatner, Sarah Jessica Parker and Brendan Fraser. 

'Oz: The Great and Powerful' Premieres in Moscow on March 01, 2013

Oz1.jpgDirector Sam Raimi, James Franco, Michelle Williams, and Mila Kunis traveled to Russia this week to premiere and promote their new film Oz: The Great and Powerful at the Oktyabr Multiplex in Moscow. What made the trip worthwhile was Disney's hopes of slicing off a similar box office take to their last big classic fantasy March release, 2010's Alice in Wonderland, which debuted to an astounding $13.8 million in Russia and went on to earn a total of $42.1 million at the box office. Numbers like that aren't easy to come by in Russia, but the Disney team is certainly giving Oz their best shot, even convincing its lead actresses to pose barelegged outdoors in 21 degree weather. Oz opens in Russia on March 7, a week before its U.S. launch. 

BOX OFFICE ACTUALS: Russian Thriller 'Metro' Claims #1 on February 26, 2013

metro.jpgAnton Megerdichev's 3D thriller Dark World made $8.3 million at the Russian box office in 2010, a record the Russian director's follow-up, Metro, will handily beat if the opening weekend box office is any indication. Metro, a natural disaster thriller that made waves on the internet even among the U.S. press when it was announced in 2011, tracks what happens when the Moscow River spills into the city's subway system, the third most heavily used in the world after Tokyo and Beijing. As the Moscow Metro is also one of the most underground in the world -- its deepest station is 276-feet below the surface, over 100 feet lower than NYC's limit -- the flood triggers a disaster in the rest of the city. Metro's $4.5 million haul is slightly less than A Good Day to Die Hard managed last weekend, but the Defender of the Fatherland national holiday on February 23rd may have played a factor. Full box office report below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RANK

TITLE

GROSS

TOTAL

WEEKS

1

Metro

$4.5M

$4.5M

1

2

A Good Day to Die Hard

$2.6M

$10.8M

2

3

The Last Stand

$1.9M

$1.9M

1

4

Dark Skies

$933K

$933K

1

5

Beautiful Creatures

$878K

$3.7M

2

6

Snitch

$762K

$762K

1

7

Gladiators of Rome

$540K

$3.6M

3

8

Hitchcock

$483K

$483K

1

9

The Impossible

$398K

$1.5M

2

10

Les Miserables

$267K

$3.4M

3


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